Fujifilm's Classic Chrome for Travel Photography
Photography

Fujifilm’s Classic Chrome for Travel Photography

If you’ve been following my photography journey, you’ll know that I shoot with a Fujifilm X-T2 and, 90% of the time, the 23mm f/2 lens. With Fujifilm’s incredible colours, I’ve learnt to rely solely on JPEGs and, over time, I’ve developed my own settings. Recently however, there’s one particular film simulation that has stood out for me. Classic Chrome.

I use Fujifilm’s Classic Chrome for travel photography especially for urban scenes where the colour palette really shines. For me, Classic Chrome produces perfectly desaturated and gritty images. I’ve used it on the streets of Bangkok during monsoon season as well as cities closer to home including Edinburgh.  Even ‘pretty cities’ such as Cork in Ireland take on a different character when shot using these colours.

Whilst you wouldn’t think something so good for gritty aesthetics would work for people shots, it just does.  Whether on the street or just simple portraits, I love the skin tones it produces.  Oh, and add mustard yellow into the frame and somehow everything is just ‘right’.

I’m not a colour technician so I can’t really go into too much detail about why it looks so good. The staff at Fujifilm will know that. All I know is that the colours are beautiful and I’ll be using this for most of my travels from now on. There’s still a place in my heart for the Astia simulation but, for anything slightly urban, I can’t get away from Classic Chrome.

If you want to take advantage of Fujifilm’s colours (and not Adobe’s take on them), I’d highly recommend shooting JPEG. Now for the bit you really came for; the pictures. Hopefully you’ll see exactly what I mean about using Fujifilm’s Classic Chrome for travel photography.

Fujifilm's Classic Chrome for Travel Photography

Fujifilm's Classic Chrome for Travel Photography

Fujifilm's Classic Chrome for Travel Photography

Fujifilm's Classic Chrome for Travel Photography

Fujifilm's Classic Chrome for Travel Photography

Fujifilm's Classic Chrome for Travel Photography

Fujifilm's Classic Chrome for Travel Photography

Fujifilm's Classic Chrome for Travel Photography

Fujifilm's Classic Chrome for Travel Photography

Fujifilm's Classic Chrome for Travel Photography

Fujifilm's Classic Chrome for Travel Photography

Fujifilm's Classic Chrome for Travel Photography

Fujifilm's Classic Chrome for Travel Photography

Fujifilm's Classic Chrome for Travel Photography

Fujifilm's Classic Chrome for Travel Photography

Fujifilm's Classic Chrome for Travel Photography

 

Fujifilm's Classic Chrome for Travel Photography

Fujifilm's Classic Chrome for Travel Photography

Fujifilm's Classic Chrome for Travel Photography

Fujifilm's Classic Chrome for Travel Photography

Fujifilm's Classic Chrome for Travel Photography

Fujifilm's Classic Chrome for Travel Photography

Fujifilm's Classic Chrome for Travel Photography

Fujifilm's Classic Chrome for Travel Photography

Please note that this post contains affiliate links where I receive a small payment if you go on to purchase the product.  This will not cost you anything more and just helps me keep this blog up and running.  I would never recommend a product that I don’t absolutely love too!

9 Comments

  • Tim Bindner

    I am mostly a monochrome shooter, but when I shoot color it is definitely CC. Great post and wonderful pictures.

      • gqglasgow

        I use it mostly for my family stuff because of the warmth. You know when Chrome leaves skin tones a little cold? That’s where it’s handy.

        It also works in nature – I haven’t tried urban settings with it, I like acros red for the streets. I dial the settings then set to shoot raw, if I like it on the lcd I convert to jpeg – if not, try something else.

    • Jörg

      The WB shift is what Ritchie Roesch is suggesting, right? I’ve never understood why Classic Chrome should be a good starting point for coming close to the Kodachrome look. Just look at Steve McCurry’s work and all these rich colors… Classic Chrome is just the opposite, (muted, desaturated colors), even with the WB shift. Any thoughts?

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