my fujifilm jpeg settings
Photography

My Fujifilm JPEG Settings

Due to the popularity of my post on switching from shooting RAW to JPEG for my images, I thought I best create one where you can see my Fujifilm JPEG settings.  These are much like using presets in Lightroom but you are applying them to the image there and then.  The below settings are the ones I use everyday and were developed through my time in Singapore, Chiang Mai and Bangkok.  At first, in Singapore, I wasn’t so good.  I kept changing my mind on how a photo should look so I kept switching JPEG profiles.  However, by the time of my last stop in Bangkok, I was much more settled.  Now, I choose the setting and leave it.

I cannot however take the full credit.  My Fujifilm JPEG settings were created through researching other Fujifilm shooters; most notably Kevin Mullins and Ritchie Roesch.  Kevin has an excellent video explaining his settings here.  Whilst Kevin focuses on weddings and Ritchie on emulating classic film looks, I thought I would see how JPEGs fare for travel photography.

Setting Up The Camera

Before I get into each of my custom settings, it is worth mentioning how I set my Fujifilm X-T2 up so that it is easier to shoot JPEGs.  With RAW, you get a lot of flexibility when it comes to post-processing yet, with JPEG, nearly everything has to be perfect at the time you press the shutter.  I like the X-T2 for this as everything is easily accessible especially when it comes to exposure compensation.  I’d hate to try this with a different brand.

I am a big believer in letting the camera do most of the work for me.  Many will probably disagree with me but I find it much easier to concentrate on capturing images than constantly fiddling with settings.  Whilst I’ve set up the whole camera for the way I shoot, these are the main ones that will help you get better JPEGs.

Aperture Priority

I shoot in aperture priority almost all of the time.  Unless there are exceptional circumstances, for example night cityscapes or panning, which require me to manually adjust the shutter speed, I just let the camera do the work for me.  You will want to control the depth of field yourself and this is exactly what aperture priority allows.  All I have to do is choose my desired aperture (often between wide open and f/8) and the camera chooses the shutter speed.  When the shutter speed gets too slow, my Auto ISO setting steps in to assist.

Auto ISO

I’m perfectly happy with stills produced at high ISO and, if the situation requires it, I have no issue with going up to 12,800.  Whilst I don’t shoot professionally, I’d rather put up with noise and have a useable image than one that comes out blurry.

I therefore use the following Auto ISO settings:

  • ISO Dial set to A
  • Default Sensitivity 200 (although it often increases to 400 even in bright daylight)
  • Max. Sensitivity 12,800
  • Min. Shutter Speed 1/125

I find that a minimum shutter speed of 1/125 is enough to maintain sharp images and the camera will increase the ISO if the shutter speed drops below that figure.

Exposure Compensation

In order to get the image properly exposed in camera, I find that I often set the exposure compensation to +1 or sometimes even +2.  This is where the Electronic View Finder (EVF) comes in handy – you can see exactly how the JPEG is going to look no matter what setting you change.  Mirrorless is the way forward I’m telling you! I’ve also added the Histogram to the EVF which tells me whether an image is properly exposed or not.

However, instead of just flicking turning the exposure dial manually, I have it set to C all of the time.  I then set the command dial on the front of my camera to adjust the exposure compensation; this way you get up to 5 stops instead of 3.  Not that I really need 5, but I actually find it so much quicker to use the command dial.

My Fujifilm JPEG Settings

To create your own JPEG settings, head to Edit/Save Custom Setting in the IQ section of the menu.  From here you can save seven different settings, all for different scenarios if you wish.  To make it even easier to switch between settings, I changed my FN5 button to ‘Select Custom Setting.’  With the camera to my eye, I can simply and very easily change presets.

Astia Travel

This is the one I use nearly all the time; for day to day images when exploring as well as my food shots.  Astia is such a versatile film simulation.  I love it so much I even used Astia when I had VSCO presets.

  • Dynamic Range (DR) Auto
  • Film Simulation (FS) Astia
  • Grain Off
  • White Balance (WB) Auto +1 Red
  • Highlight -1
  • Shadow +2
  • Color +2
  • Sharpness -1
  • Noise Reduction (NR) -3

my fujifilm jpeg settings

Chrome Urban

Ah Classic Chrome. The film simulation of Gods. I believe it’s Fujifilm’s version of a very popular Kodak film.  This is the one that I switch to for street photography or if it starts to rain.  The combination of Classic Chrome and reflections in rain is just beautiful; in a grungy kind of way.

  • DR Auto
  • FS Classic Chrome
  • Grain Off
  • WB Auto +1 Red
  • Highlight 0
  • Shadow +2
  • Color +3
  • Sharpness +3
  • NR -3

my fujifilm jpeg settings

Velvia LS

For landscapes, I often use Velvia which really brings out the colour in every scene.  I also used this in Little India in Singapore where the bright colours couldn’t have been captured any other way.  I don’t however find myself using this too much.

  • DR Auto
  • FS Velvia
  • Grain Off
  • WB Auto +1 Red
  • Highlight -1
  • Shadow +3
  • Color +4
  • Sharpness +2
  • NR -1

Pro Port

I owe this one to Kevin Mullins; it’s a really soft and subtle setting used for portraits.  I don’t shoot that many portraits at all but I found that it worked well in capturing details in a Bangkok hotel.  However, when I have used it for a portrait, it works wonders.  I love the look this gives and hopefully will use it more once I buy the 56mm f/1.2.

  • DR Auto
  • FS Pro Neg. Hi (You could use the standard version for something even subtler)
  • Grain Weak
  • WB Auto +1 Red
  • Highlight -2
  • Shadow +2
  • Color -3
  • Sharpness +1
  • NR -2

my fujifilm jpeg settings

Acros 1R

I’ve always had a funny relationship with black and white images.  I mean, I love them, but I never found my pictures were good enough.  Enter Fujifilm’s Acros film simulation.  It isn’t a film that I’ve ever used before but as soon as I applied the Acros setting on my camera, I fell in love.  Especially when you add in the Red filter.  It just adds a kind of contrast that does wonders for photos.  On my 29th birthday in Bangkok, I set out to record all of it solely in black and white and the pictures came out beautiful!

  • DR Auto
  • FS Acros Red
  • Grain Off
  • WB Auto +1 Red
  • Highlight -1
  • Shadow +3
  • Sharpness +1
  • NR -1

my fujifilm jpeg settings

Acros 2

Another black and white setting with Acros but this time it’s a lot more subtle with the added Green filter.  I use this one very occasionally.

  • DR 200
  • FS Acros
  • Grain Off
  • WB Auto +1 Red
  • Highlight +2
  • Shadow +2
  • Sharpness +2
  • NR -2

Superia 800

I love Ritchie Roesch’s recreations of classic films and here’s a great one of Fujicolor Superia 800.  On his website, he explains a lot more about the film look so here I’ll just put down the settings I use for it.  Sometimes I switch the white balance to Auto and manually input the colour shift but often I’ll forget so I’ve set it up on the Daylight setting.  It doesn’t work all the time but, when it does, I love it!  I leave this setting, number 7, for my ‘creative’ looks and will change it regularly.  I tried Ritchie’s version of Kodak Portra 400 but I couldn’t get away with the white balance.  However, he does show that it can be beautiful!

  • DR 200
  • FS Pro Neg Standard
  • Grain Weak
  • WB Daylight -2 Red -3 Blue
  • Highlight +1
  • Shadow +2
  • Color +4
  • Sharpness +1
  • NR -1

my fujifilm jpeg settings

Post-Processing

To add a bit of an extra punch, I have set up an Import Preset for my JPEGs which is applied to all of my photos.  I add +10 contrast, +10 clarity and -5 vignette and a small S-Curve.  I’m not sure whether you’ll find all of this pointless as I could do everything in RAW and just apply Presets along the way.  However, shooting this way rapidly speeds up my editing process.  I can concentrate on shooting more and worrying less about having to spend hours and hours editing.

Hopefully, you’ll use these settings as inspiration for your own photos.  Over time, I may adjust these more to my liking.  Of course, they might not work for you but I really encourage you to try and shoot JPEG only from now on.  I do have to admit that, thanks to the X-T2’s dual card slots, I shoot RAW & JPEG.  The RAWs are only as a backup and just stay on my 64GB card in my camera.  Once I’m happy with the JPEGs and I’m confident I haven’t messed anything up, the RAW files are just deleted.

If you fancy sticking round a bit longer, why not check out what’s in my camera bag?

Leave a comment below or send me a message if you want to know more and just discuss photography in general.

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My Fujifilm JPEG Settings

My Fujifilm JPEG Settings

My Fujifilm JPEG Settings

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